Digital Eclipse

The Nikon MicroscopyU Digital Eclipse image gallery features photomicrographs captured digitally using the DXM 1200 camera system coupled to a variety of Nikon microscopes. We hope you enjoy your visit!

  • Algae

    Algae

    Algae Spiral Chloroplasts

    Algae are classified into several types based on the morphology of their vegetative, or growing, state. Filamentous algae have cells arranged in chains and an overall appearance like strings or filaments. Some filaments are unbranched, while others have extensive branching, giving them a bushlike appearance.
  • Algae

    Amoeba

    Chaos carolinensis (Amoeba)

    Many species that belong to the order Amoebida are free living, but some are well-known parasites of plants and animals. At least six forms of amoeba are parasitic in humans The most well known of these is Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amebic dysentery. This often occurs in epidemics when raw sewage contaminates water supplies or when soil for crops is fertilized with untreated human wastes.
  • Algae

    Bordered Pits

    Bordered Pits 20x

    The pattern and types of pits are characteristic of particular species and useful for identifying different types of wood. Some have tyloses, balloonlike outgrowths of parenchyma cells that bulge through the circular bordered pits of vessel members and block water movement. The presence of tyloses in white oaks makes their wood watertight, which is why it is preferred in casks and shipbuilding to red oak, which lacks tyloses and does not hold water.
  • Bovine Pulmonary Artery

    Bovine Artery

    Bovine Pulmonary Artery

    The pulmonary artery emerges above the right chamber of the heart, separating into two branches that enter the right and left lungs. In the lungs, the arteries further subdivide into smaller and smaller branches until they reach the capillaries in the pulmonary air sacs (alveoli). In the capillaries, blood takes up oxygen from the air breathed into the air sacs and releases carbon dioxide. It then flows into larger and larger vessels until it reaches the pulmonary veins. These veins open into the left atrium of the heart, which then pumps the freshly oxygenated blood to the rest of the body.
  • Chironomid (Midge) Larva

    Chironomid Larva

    Chironomid (Midge) Larva

    Chironomids are the non-biting midges, one of the most diverse and widespread groups of Diptera (flies). They inhabit virtually the entire range of aquatic ecosystems, both fresh and marine, as well as semi-terrestrial and terrestrial habitats. Most species have aquatic wormlike larval stages that start as egg masses laid on the water surface. After going through a pupal stage, floating at the surface of the water, a full-grown midge emerges and flies away. Larvae of some species build a protective capsule made of secretions and debris that they live in during the stage, emerging only long enough to feed.
  • Chironomid Larva Blood Vessels

    Larva Vessels

    Chironomid Larva Blood Vessels

    Non-biting midges are one of the most diverse and widespread dipteran groups known. They inhabit virtually the entire range of aquatic ecosystems, both fresh and marine, as well as semi-terrestrial and terrestrial habitats. Most species have aquatic wormlike larval stages that start as egg masses laid on the water surface. After going through a pupal stage, floating at the surface of the water, a full-grown midge emerges and flies away. Larvae of some species build a protective capsule made of secretions and debris that they live in during the stage, emerging only long enough to feed.
  • Collotheca Rotifer

    Collotheca Rotifer

    Collotheca Rotifer

    Collotheca belongs to the rotifer class Monogononta. These rotifers are sessile; they are either attached to each other forming a spherical colony, or attached individually to the substrate. Each rotifer secretes a gelatinous tube into which it withdraws when disturbed. After a period of time, it extends and the infundibulum opens like a blossom. Collotheca have extremely long tentacle-like cilia surrounding the corona. Although they are flexible enough to be folded up and pulled inside when the rotifer retreats into its tube, for feeding they are extended and appear to become rigid. Wavelike ripples along the cilia create currents that sweep smaller microorganisms into the mouth at the bottom of the infundibulum.
  • Corn Kernel

    Corn Kernel

    Corn Kernel

    Teosinte (Zea mexicana), a perennial wild corn thought to be extinct, still grows today in Mexico. Since its introduction into Europe in the 15th century, corn cultivation has spread to all areas of the world where it can be grown. In addition to providing food for human consumption, corn is also used as livestock feed. The inedible parts, such as the cob and husk, are used as raw material in industry.
  • Culex (Mosquito) Antennae

    Culex Antennae

    Culex (Mosquito) Antennae

    The male mosquito has large bushy antennae, which he uses to listen for the buzz of a potential mate. He responds only to the humming frequency given by a female of the same species and will fly in the direction of the sound to mate with her. Male mosquitoes do not bite, but feed on plant juices and flower nectar. Only female mosquitoes bite animals and require a blood meal.
  • Diatom Frustules

    Diatom Frustules

    Diatom Frustules

    Diatoms have a silicified cell wall forms a pillbox-like shell (frustule) composed of overlapping halves that contain intricate and delicate markings useful in testing the resolving power of microscope lenses. The beautiful symmetry and exquisite design of diatom frustules have gained them the title "jewel of the sea."
  • Dinosaur Bone

    Dinosaur Bone

    Dinosaur Bone

    Under polarized light, thin sections of fossilized dinosaur bones exhibit striking colors and patterns as evidenced by this photomicrograph. The term fossil refers to any preserved remains or imprint of a living organism (usually ancient), such as a bone, shell, footprint, or leaf impression. Most of the dinosaur fossils found today are mineralized bones, but they also include footprints, tracks, eggs, skin impressions, stomach stones (known as gastroliths), and fossilized feces (known as coprolites).
  • Dogfish Shark Placoid Scale

    Dogfish Shark

    Dogfish Shark Placoid Scale

    Scales are small plates that form part of the skin of certain animals. They provide protection from the environment and from predators. Sharks have placoid scales, bony, spiny projections with an enamel-like covering. These scales have the same structure as their teeth, and are also referred to as dermal denticles (dermal=skin, denticle=teeth). These denticles are slanted toward the tail of the shark and help direct the flow of water around the shark's body, reducing friction so it can swim with less effort. Stroking a shark from head to tail, its skin feels smooth to the touch, but stroking it from tail to head, the skin feels rough as sandpaper. Shark's skin has, in fact, been used as sandpaper in some countries for many centuries. A shark can also inflict wounds on potential prey by breaking the creature's skin with its scales. Like teeth, the shape of the scales varies among shark species and can be used to identify them.
  • Down Feather

    Down Feather

    Down Feather

    Feathers have an exquisite beauty and functionality that has captured the attention and imagination of people for centuries. They are specialized epidermal growths, formed by papillae that are composed of keratin, lipids, and pigments that give them their brilliant colors. Keratin is an ideal material for feathers because it is lightweight and flexible, yet strong enough to form a structure that can withstand the rigors of flight.
  • Elderberry Lenticel

    Elderberry

    Elderberry Lenticel

    A lenticel is a loose aggregation of cells that penetrates the surface of a woody plant. Upon close inspection, it appears to be a blister-like break in the surface. These cells exchange gases between the atmosphere and the underlying tissues. Each lenticel becomes a pathway through which oxygen and other gases can diffuse to the living cells of the bark. Without sufficient oxygen, the cells of the bark would die.
  • Ephedrine Crystallites

    Ephedrine

    Ephedrine Crystallites

    Ephedrine is a member of the adrenergic bronchodilator class of drugs that serve to open up the bronchial tubes of the lungs. Since the 1920s, synthetic versions of this drug have been used as a bronchodilator and nasal decongestant, and for controlling urinary incontinence. Although ephedrine is too slow acting to treat acute allergic attacks, it replaces epinephrine in nonemergency treatment of allergic reactions.
  • Fern Sori

    Fern Sori

    Fern Sori

    Fern is a common name for the cryptogamous (spore-producing) plants belonging to the division Filicophyta, also called Filicinophyta. They are primitive vascular plants with true roots, stems, and complex leaves. Most ferns reproduce through the alternation of generations, alternating successive generations of sexual and asexual forms.
  • Flea Hairs

    Flea Hairs

    Flea Hairs

    Some species of fleas, such as the cat flea, have rearward projecting bristle-like hairs that help them to move forward through an animal's fur and keep them from falling out. Ctenocephalides felis is commonly known as the cat flea and Ctenocephalides canis is known as the dog flea. Both are members of the 1,600 species referred to as fleas, order Siphonaptera ("wingless siphon"). These blood-sucking insects can be found worldwide, from the Arctic to the tropics.
  • Ginkgo Leaf

    Ginkgo Leaf

    Ginkgo Leaf

    Ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba) is a common ornamental plant that is considered to be a living fossil. Also called the maidenhair tree, it is a deciduous gymnosperm (related to pine trees and cycads) that is the only living representative of the order Ginkgoales, once a widespread, dominant group of plants. Most members of this order are known only by their fossils, which date back to the Permian period, 286 to 245 million years ago. Fossil leaves similar to the living Ginkgo have been dated back to the Jurassic period, 208 to 144 million years ago. These fossils have been described from such geographically separated areas as Australia, western North America, Mongolia, Alaska, England, and central Europe.
  • Glutaric Acid Crystallites

    Glutaric Acid

    Glutaric Acid Crystallites

    One of the dicarboxylic acids, glutaric acid is a by-product of amino acid metabolism. In humans, a devastating genetic disorder called Glutaric Aciduria interferes with the ability to properly digest protein resulting in the build-up of glutaric acid in the bloodstream. Left undiagnosed and untreated, this condition can damage two nerve clusters in the brain involved in controlling posture and movement, causing serious and permanent disability.
  • Herbaceous Stem

    Herbaceous Stem

    Herbaceous Stem

    The stems of herbaceous plants are soft and flexible and are found typically on annuals, such as most vegetables, plants that grow for only one season. The herbaceous stem is composed of vascular bundles (xylem and phloem) arranged in a circle around a central core of spongy tissue made up of parenchyma cells, called the pith. Surrounding the vascular bundles is a layer known as the cortex, which varies in thickness from species to species. Surrounding this is a layer of cells called the epidermis.
  • Hydroxymethyl Pyrone Crystallites

    Hydroxymethyl

    Hydroxymethyl Pyrone Crystallites

    Also known as kojic acid, hydroxymethyl pyrone is widely used in the medical field as a pain killer, and an anti-inflammatory drug. It has dermatologic applications, used as a protective agent against UV light, and to lighten pigment spots and discolorations on the skin by inhibiting the formation of pigment. In the food industry, this antioxidant is also used as a precursor of flavor enhancers and to inhibit discoloration in agricultural products (by inhibiting polyphenol oxidase).
  • Lecane Rotifer

    Lecane Rotifer

    Lecane Rotifer

    Rotifers are extremely common and can be found in many freshwater environments and in moist soil, where they inhabit the thin films of water surrounding soil particles. Their habitats may include still water environments, such as lake bottoms, as well as rivers or streams. They are also commonly found on mosses and lichens, in rain gutters and puddles, in soil or leaf litter, on mushrooms growing near dead trees, in tanks of sewage treatment plants, and even on freshwater crustaceans and aquatic insect larvae.
  • Lily Seed Embryos

    Lily Seed Embryos

    Lily Seed Embryos

    The lily is an herbaceous flowering plant native to the temperate areas of the Northern Hemisphere. The name, lily, is most frequently applied to the 80-100 species belonging to the genus Lilium of the family Liliaceae.
  • Apollo 14 Moon Rock

    Moon Rock

    Apollo 14 Moon Rock

    Between 1969 and 1972 the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) successfully landed 12 astronauts on the lunar surface. The astronauts who visited the Moon carefully collected 2,196 documented samples of lunar soils and rocks weighing a total of 382 kilograms (843 pounds) during approximately 80 hours of exploration. It is important to note that these samples were gathered from a harsh lunar environment that included wildly fluctuating temperatures in an almost complete vacuum, dangerous solar radiation, and the uncertainty of return to Earth due to equipment failure.
  • Moth Wing

    Moth Wing

    Moth Wing

    The wings of butterflies and moths may be plain-colored or they may have striking and colorful patterns. These structures are unique because they are covered by microscopic scales that aid in flight, waterproofing, and coloring. Each scale has a grid of high and low ribs and it is the size, pattern and spacing of these ribs that reflect and refract light to give the appearance of color. Each wing may have hundreds or thousands of scales that contribute to the wing color pattern.
  • Mouse Intestine

    Mouse Intestine

    Mouse Intestine

    Laboratory mice are special breeds of house mice and are used in many scientific experiments because of their close mammalian relationship to humans. Compared to larger mammals, mice and other rodents are small, easy to handle, inexpensive to house, and breed quickly. During the late 20th Century (and on into the current century), scientists bred different strains of mice with genetic deficiencies in order to produce models for human diseases.
  • Mouse Kidney

    Mouse Kidney

    Mouse Kidney

    The kidney is an organ that maintains water balance and expels metabolic wastes in vertebrates and some invertebrates. Primitive and embryonic kidneys have sets of specialized tubules that empty into two collecting ducts that pass urine into a primitive bladder. The more advanced mammalian kidney is a paired compact organ with functional units, called nephrons, that filter the blood, reabsorbing water and nutrients and secreting wastes, producing the final urine.
  • Oleander Leaf

    Oleander Leaf

    Oleander Leaf

    Oleander, Nerium oleander, is an ornamental evergreen that belongs to the dogbane family, Apocynaceae. The best-known oleander shrub, called rosebay, is native to the Mediterranean and Middle East regions and is distinguished by dark green leaves that are thick, leathery, and lance-like.
  • Pectinatella (Jelly Blob)

    Jelly Blob

    Pectinatella (Jelly Blob)

    The majority of bryozoans are marine (several thousand species), but one class, the Phylactolaemata, is found exclusively in fresh water. Pectinatella magnifica, one species belonging to this class, is commonly found in freshwater lakes and rivers in North America. Most people call them "jelly blobs" or just plain "blobs" given their appearance. Each colony is a collection of genetically identical organisms (zooids) that exude a protective matrix, a gelatin-like substance made mostly of water, firm but slimy to the touch.
  • Philodina Rotifer

    Philodina Rotifer

    Philodina Rotifer

    Philodina belongs to the class Bdelloidea (from the Greek for leech), rotifers that have two ovaries. This type of rotifer moves in two modes. Fully extended it moves like a leech or inchworm along aquatics and detritus. Contracted, with corona extended, it swims freely. To feed, they "cement" themselves to a surface and sway through the water, sifting for smaller organisms or particles of debris. Males have never been observed. Reproduction is solely by parthenogenesis (females producing only females), making rotifers of this class unique in the animal kingdom.
  • Pine Needle

    Pine Needle

    Pine Needle

    Pine is the common name for species belonging to the genus Pinus, a member of the family Pinaceae, resinous trees with needle-like leaves. Consisting of about 262 species, this is the largest family of conifers and includes fir, larch, spruce, hemlock, cedar and Douglas fir.
  • Plasmodesmata

    Plasmodesmata

    Plasmodesmata

    Plasmodesmata (singular, plasmodesma) are small tubes that connect plant cells to each other, establishing living bridges between cells. Similar to the gap junction found in animal cells, the plasmodesmata penetrate both the primary and secondary cell walls, allowing certain molecules to pass directly from one cell to another.
  • Smilax Root

    Smilax Root

    Smilax Root

    Smilax is a genus of sprawling plants that belong to the lily family, Liliaceae. Prolific in many habitats throughout the world, most Smilax species feature sharp thorns and spiraling tendrils that make them good climbers. Alternatively referred to by a variety of common names, such as catbriers and greenbriers, tangled masses of the vines may form dense thickets that are impassable to humans, though they serve as a desirable form of shelter for birds and other small animals. Many of these same creatures further exploit the plants by feeding upon the small, dark berries they produce.
  • Spiderwort Leaf

    Spiderwort Leaf

    Spiderwort Leaf

    Spiderworts are plants belonging to the genus Tradescantia, herbaceous flowering plants that can be found growing in moist tropical to subtemperate habitats around the world. In the North American prairie states, many of these plants are known as "cow slobber" because of the gooey, stringy sap they produce. When stretched out, the sap can also resemble strands of a spider's web, which probably gave rise to the "spiderwort" name.
  • Squash Bug Mouthparts

    Squash Bug

    Squash Bug Mouthparts

    Squash bugs, Anasa tristis, are "true bugs" that utilize their piercing sucking mouthparts to remove plant juices. They attack cucurbits (squash, cucumbers, and melons) throughout Central America, the United States, and southern Canada, with a preference for squash and pumpkins. They are generally found on well-established plants as opposed to being a pest of seedling plants.
  • Sulfosalicylic Acid Crystallites

    Sulfosalicylic Acid

    Sulfosalicylic Acid Crystallites

    Sulfosalicylic acid is a trifunctional aromatic compound that undergoes reactions typical of phenols, carboxylic and sulfonic acid moieties. In medical testing, it is used to precipitate proteins from urine; it is a necessary adjunct to dipstick test methods in testing for certain types of protein in urine. The chemical is used industrially as a chelating agent, an intermediate in the manufacture of surface-active reagents, as an organic catalyst, and grease additive. When recrystallized from the melt, sulfosalicylic acid will slowly crystallize, forming beautiful dendritic needle-like crystals.
  • Vitamin C Crystallites

    Vitamin C

    Vitamin C Crystallites

    Ascorbic acid, also known by the chemical name L-ascorbic acid, is a water-soluble vitamin that functions as a powerful antioxidant. Although most animals can synthesize vitamin C, others — such as including humans and other primates and guinea pigs — obtain it only through their diets. Vitamin C is commonly found naturally in peppers, citrus fruits, tomatoes, melons, broccoli, and green leafy vegetables such as spinach, turnip, and mustard greens.
  • Vorticella (Ciliata)

    Vorticella (Ciliata)

    Vorticella (Ciliata)

    These bell-shaped ciliates live in fresh or salt water attached by a slender, unciliated stalk to aquatic plants, surface scum, submerged objects, or aquatic animals. Vorticella eat bacteria and small protozoans, using their cilia to sweep prey into their mouth-like openings.
  • Young Starfish

    Young Starfish

    Young Starfish

    Starfish, or sea stars, are perhaps one of the most familiar of marine organisms and are practically a symbol of ocean life. Despite their name, they are echinoderms not fish and breathe through structures on their skin, not through gills.
  • Zamia Ovule

    Zamia Ovule

    Zamia Ovule

    The Zamia genus belongs to the Cycadophyta division of gymnosperms, an ancient lineage of plants that preceded the flowering plants, flourishing during the Mesozoic Era, about 245 to 66.4 million years ago. They have crowns of large, pinnately compound leaves and have cones at the ends of the branches. Male cones produce pollen that is carried by the wind to female cones on separate plants, where fertilization occurs. Like other gymnosperms, such as pine trees, cycads produce naked ovules in contrast to the flowering plants in which the ovules are enclosed in an ovary.

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